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Transcript - Public notice about Macquarie's journey over the Blue Mountains (10 of 15)

Dated 10 June 1815 Describing Macquarie's recent 'tour' over the Blue Mountains and Bathurst. The Bathurst Plains are "at first view very much the appearance of lands in a state of cultivation." NRS 1046 [SZ759, page 109; Reel 6038]

109

latter, has also two very fertile plains on its banks,

the one called, ‘O’Connells Plains’ and the other

‘Macquarie Plains’, both of considerable extent and

very capable of yielding all the necessaries of life.

At the distance of seven miles from the bridge

over the Campbell River, Bathurst Plains open

to the view, presenting a rich tract of champaign

country, of 11 miles in length, bounded on both sides

by gently rising and very beautiful hills, thinly

wooded. The Macquarie River, which is con

stituted by the junction of the Fish and Campbell

Rivers, takes a winding course through the Plains,

which can be easily traced from the high lands

adjoining, by the particular verdure of the trees

on its banks, which are likewise the only trees

throughout the extent of the Plains. The level

and clean surface of these Plains gives them

at first view very much the appearance of

lands in a state of cultivation.

It is impossible to behold this grand

scene without a feeling of admiration and

surprize, whilst the silence and solitude

which reign in a space of such extent and

beauty as seems designed by Nature for the

occupancy and comfort of Man, create a de-

gree of melancholy in the mind which may

be more easily imagined than described.

The Governor and Suite arrived at these

Plains on Thursday the 4th of May, and

encamped on the southern or left bank of the

Macquarie River. The situation being selected

in consequence of its commanding a beautiful

and extensive prospect for many miles in

every direction around it. At this place the

Governor remained for a week, which time he

occupied in making excursions in different

directions through the adjoining country, on

both sides of the river.

On Sunday the 7th of May, the Governor

fixed on a site suitable for the Erection of a

Town at some future period to which he

gave