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Transcript - Public notice about Macquarie's journey over the Blue Mountains (11 of 15)

Dated 10 June 1815 Describing Macquarie's recent 'tour' over the Blue Mountains and Bathurst. Naming of Bathurst "in Honour of the present Secretary of State for the Colonies." Also that "the favourable Reports which he had received of the country to the West of the Blue Mountains have not been by any means exaggerated." NRS 1046 [SZ759, page 110; Reel 6038]

110

gave the name of ‘Bathurst’, in Honour of

the present Secretary of State for the Colonies.

The situation of Bathurst is elevated sufficiently

beyond the reach of any Floods which may occur,

and is at the same time so near the River

on its south bank as to derive all the advant

ages of its clear and beautiful stream. The

Mechanics and Settlers of whatever description

who may be hereafter permitted to form per-

manent residences to themselves at this place,

will have the highly important advantages

of a rich and fertile soil, with a beautiful

river flowing through it, for all the uses of

man. The Governor must however add, that

the hopes which were once so sanguinely

entertained of this River becoming navigable

to the Western Sea, have ended in disappoint-

ment.

During the week that the Governor

remained at Bathurst, he made daily

excursions in various directions; one of

these extended 22 miles in south-west

direction, and on that occasion, as well

as on all the others, he found the country

composed chiefly of vallies and plains,

separated occasionally by ranges of

low hills; the soil throughout being

generally fertile, and well circumstanced

for the purpose of agriculture or grazing.

The Governor here feels much much pleasure

in being enabled to communicate to the

Public, that the favourable Reports which

he had received of the country to the West

of the Blue Mountains have not been by

any means exaggerated. The difficulties

which present themselves in the journey

from hence are certainly great and inevi-

table but those persons who may be inclined

to become permanent settlers there, will

probably content themselves with visiting

this part of the Colony but rarely, and of

course will have them seldom to encounter

Plen-