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State archives relating to Aboriginal People: Appendices

Appendix 1 - An Administrative History of Contact between the Government of New South Wales and Aboriginal people

From first contact to Myall Creek

The record of the official policies of the Government of New South Wales from its establishment in 1788 is contained within the archives and public records of the State. Official contact with Aboriginal people has been continuous since 1788 and the first bureaucratic intervention came in 1815 when Governor Macquarie founded the Native Institution as a school for Aboriginal children of both sexes.1 The Government also subsidised missionary activity among the Aboriginal people, including that of the London Missionary Society in the 1820s and 1830s; the Reverend L.E. Threlkeld's Mission at Lake Macquarie being notable. Official activity was either benevolent, as in the distribution of boats and blankets by the authority of the Colonial Secretary, or aimed at control, as in the establishment of the Mounted Police and the Native Police.

The Myall Creek Massacre and protection

In 1838 following some violent clashes between Europeans and Aboriginal people, which resulted in massacres of Aboriginal people, a Bill for the Protection of Aborigines was drafted, which contained provisions to protect

their just rights and privileges as subjects of Her Majesty the Queen.2

1838 was also the year the Government of New South Wales, on instructions from the Secretary of State for the Colonies in London, instituted the short-lived experiment of a Protectorate of Aborigines based in Port Phillip.3 Funding for the Protectorate was cut in 1842, and it was abolished in 1849.

Until 1881 the main government agencies which dealt with Aboriginal people were the Colonial Secretary, Police and Lands Department.

In 1880 a private body known as the Association for the Protection of Aborigines was formed

for the purpose of ameliorating the present deplorable condition of the remnants of the Aborigine tribes of this colony.4

Following agitation by this body, the Government appointed a Protector of Aborigines, Mr. George Thornton MLC.5

The Aborigines Protection Board

A year later the Colonial Secretary and Premier (Alexander Stuart) in a Minute of 26 February 1883 created a Board for the Protection of Aborigines.6 This Board was to be

composed partly of officials and partly of gentlemen who have taken an interest in the blacks, have made themselves acquainted with their habits, and are animated by a desire to assist raising them from their present degraded condition.7

The creation of the Board was ratified at a meeting of the Executive Council on 5 June 1883.8

The objectives of the Board were to

provide asylum for the aged and sick, who are dependent on others for help and support; but also, and of at least equal importance to train and teach the young, to fit them to take their places amongst the rest of the community.9

The first members of the Board were three Members of the Legislative Council (including George Thornton, the former Protector), one private citizen (a lawyer), and two public servants. One of the latter was Edmund Fosbery, the Inspector-General of Police.

Around the same time the Government established the State Children's Relief Board under the State Children Relief Act 1881 which had powers to remove children from charitable institutions, admit them to wardship and approve adoption of wards. This legislation set the scene for the future removal of Aboriginal children from their families.

The connection between the Board and the Police remained strong, with police representing the Board in most country areas, and also undertaking supervision of the reserves. The new Board also had the power to appoint Local Boards to aid the Board's business, which were, in most cases, comprised of local police and Police Magistrates. These Local Boards appear not to have been successful and were reconstituted by the Aborigines Protection Act 1909 (No. 25) into Local Committees. These were also deemed a failure as in 1915 they were

discontinued due to delays in administration and their failure to function expeditiously and were replaced by two Inspectors of Aboriginal Affairs.10

The connection with the Aboriginal Protection Association was maintained, with the Board subsidising the Mission Stations which continued to be administered by the Association.11 In 1892, following a decline in public financial support, the Association turned over the management of these Stations to the Board.12

The Policy of control and removal of children

In 1909 the Board was reconstituted and became a statutory body under the Aborigines Protection Act 1909 (No. 25). This happened because the Board felt they had

practically no authority over either the Aborigines or the Reserves set apart for their use, and it is very desirable that they should be clothed with sufficient powers to enable them to successfully carry out their work of endeavouring to ameliorate the condition of the race.13

The Act specified that the Board would consist of the Inspector-General of Police, who would be ex officio Chairman, and not more than ten other members who would be appointed by the Governor. The functions of the Board were to apportion, distribute, and apply any monies voted by Parliament on behalf of Aborigines; to provide for the custody, maintenance, and education of the children of Aborigines; to manage and regulate the reserves; and to exercise a general supervision and care over all matters affecting the interests and welfare of Aborigines, and to protect them against injustice, imposition and fraud. The Act was proclaimed in the New South Wales Government Gazette to come into force on 1 June 1910.14 Under this Act the Board regularised and continued the policy of removing children from their families. In 1911 the Cootamundra Girls' Home was opened to train Aboriginal girls for domestic service. Placement in the Home meant removal from their families.

In 1915 this Act was amended by the Aborigines Protection Amending Act 1915 (No. 2) which gave the Board further powers over apprentices and gave it the right to assure full custody and control over the child of any Aboriginal person, if after due inquiry it was satisfied that such a course was in the interest of the moral or physical welfare of the child.

The Act remained substantially the same until 1936 when the Aborigines Protection (Amendment) Act 1936 (No. 32) was passed, under which additional wide powers were conferred upon the Board. It consolidated the child removal sections and gave the Board complete power over the lives and future of every Aboriginal person in New South Wales.

Inquiries, agitation and a Welfare Board

In 1937 the Aborigines Progressive Association was formed, giving Aboriginal people their own vehicle for political debate and agitation. The same year the Legislative Assembly of the Parliament of New South Wales set up a Select Committee to inquire into the workings of the Aborigines Protection Board; and the following year the Public Service Board also held an inquiry into the Board.

The Sesquicentenary year of white settlement (1938), also saw the growth of the Aboriginal political movement, with the Day of Mourning and Protest being held on 26 January 1938. Soon afterwards the Committee for Aboriginal Citizens Rights was formed; and the Aborigines Progressive Association began to publish their journal, the Australian Abo Call, from March 1938.

In 1940 the Board was reconstituted by the Aborigines Protection (Amendment) Act 1940 (No. 12). This Act renamed the Board the Aborigines Welfare Board, and broke the nexus between the position of Chairman of the Board and Inspector General of Police. From then on the Chairman of the Board was to be ex officio the Under Secretary of the Chief Secretary's Department. The other members of the Board were: the Superintendent of Aboriginal Welfare (a Board official); an officer of the Department of Public Instruction; an officer of the Department of Public Health; a member of the police force of or above the rank of inspector; an expert in agriculture; an expert in sociology and/or anthropology and three nominated by the Minister. The Board's membership structure was changed once more in 1943 by the Aborigines Protection (Amendment) Act 1943 (No. 13) which provided for the appointment of two Aborigines to the Board. This Act also provided for the incorporation of the Board; and for exemptions from those parts of the Act which prohibited Aborigines from being supplied with alcohol. These liquor provisions were removed from the Act in 1963.

The 1960s saw a different kind of political activity with the Freedom Rides, modelled on the American Civil Rights movement, taking place throughout northern New South Wales. The Parliament of New South Wales also set up a Joint Select Committee on Aborigines welfare. As a result of this Committee's Report, the Aborigines Welfare Board was abolished in 1969 by the Aborigines Act 1969 (No. 7).

After the Board

In place of the Board the Act created two new bodies, one administrative (the Directorate of Aboriginal Welfare), and one advisory (the Aborigines Advisory Council). The Directorate of Aboriginal Welfare was placed under the administration of the Department of Child Welfare and Social Welfare (later Youth and Community Services, now Community Services).15 In 1975 the Commonwealth Government took over the functions of the Directorate, which then became the Aboriginal Services Branch of the Department.16 In 1982 the Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs was created and took over the functions of the Aboriginal Services Branch.

The abolition of the Board meant that Aboriginal children under the care of the Board became wards of the State. Six years later in 1975 the title to Missions and Reserves in New South Wales was handed over to the New South Wales Aboriginal Lands Trust. In 1983 the Aboriginal Land Rights Act 1983 (No. 42) was passed.

The Department of Aboriginal Affairs is the successor agency to the Board and consequently retains the right to set the access conditions for the records.17 It does this in consultation with State Records, specifying that any person who wishes to see the records must consult with the Department first. These decisions on access are made by Aboriginal people within the Department of Aboriginal Affairs after consultation with Aboriginal organisations, the responsible Minister and the Archives Authority.

Footnotes

1 Supreme Court: Miscellaneous Correspondence relating to Aborigines; Government and General Order of 14 December 1814 [5/1161]; COD 294A; the New South Wales Government Submission to the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from their Families, March 1996, has a useful Chronology on pages 3-6. This Submission is also a detailed history of official administrative contact with the Aboriginal people.

2 Colonial Secretary: Copies of Minutes and Memoranda Received, 1838 [4/1013]. This bundle also contains policy drafts, Minutes, and correspondence relating to land rights sovereignty, and conflict between British settlers and Aboriginal people.

3 Historical Records of Australia, Series 1, Volume XIX, pp.252-255. Despatch No. 72 dated 31 January 1838.

4 New South Wales Aborigines Protection Association, Report 1881-1882, Sydney, 1882.

5 New South Wales Government Gazette, 30 December 1881, p.6816; Colonial Secretary: Copies of Minutes and Memoranda Received, 1882, Minute No. M18310 of 3 January 1882 in Colonial Secretary In Letter 82/98 [1/2523].

6 Colonial Secretary: Copies of Minutes and Memoranda Received, 1883, Minute No. M18452/2 [1/2542].

7  ibid.

8 Executive Council: Minute Books, Volume 23, Minute No. 21, 2 June 1883, p.58. [4/1570]; New South Wales Government Gazette, 5 June 1883, p.3087.

9 Aborigines Protection Board, Annual Report, 1885, p.3, in New South Wales, Votes and Proceedings of the Legislative Assembly, 1885, Volume 2, p.605.

10 Public Service Board, Special Bundles: Report and Recommendations of the Public Service Board on Aborigines Protection, 1940, p.8. [6/4501.1]; Manuscript original is in the Chief (Colonial) Secretary's Special Bundles, 1938 [4/8565.2]; also printed in New South Wales, Parliamentary Papers, Session 1938-39-40, Volume 7, pp.739-786.

11 The stations were Cumeragunja, Warangesda, Maloga, and (later) Brewarrina.

12 Aborigines Protection Board, Annual Report, 1892, in New South Wales, Votes and Proceedings of the Legislative Assembly, Session 1892-3, Volume 7, pp.1144-1155.

13 Letter from the Secretary of the Aborigines Protection Board to the Under Secretary of the Chief Secretary's Department in Colonial Secretary In Letter 09/102 [5/7030]. The subject of the letter was the definition of the word 'Aborigine' in the draft Bill.

14 New South Wales Government Gazette, 11 May 1910, p.2486.

15 Report of the Minister for Social Welfare on the workings of the Aborigines Act, 1969, for the year ended 30 June 1970, pp.6-7, in New South Wales, Parliamentary Papers, Session 1969-70-71, Volume 1, pp.6-7.

16 Department of Youth and Community Services, Annual Report for the year ended 30 June 1976, p.32, in New South Wales, Parliamentary Papers, Session 1976-77-78, Volume 12, p.1285.

17 The Department was established in 1995. New South Wales Government Gazette, Special Supplement, 5 April 1995, p.1859 and p.1860.

Appendix 2 - Chronology of Significant Events

This chronology gives an overview of significant events which have happened in Australia since 1788, concentrating on the relations between Aboriginal people and the post-1788 immigrants.

Some other events are shown in order to give an historical context. Some of these events generated many records whereas other records are the result of legislative changes. Please note that all institutions and legislation are from New South Wales, unless otherwise noted.

Pre-1788 Aboriginal people lived in Australia for many tens of thousands of years in a large number of tribal and language groupings. It has been estimated that there were about 600 Aboriginal tribes in Australia in 1788.
1788 Arrival of the First Fleet and first conflict between the newcomers and the original inhabitants
1788-1802 Pemulwuy leads a guerilla war against the British settlement
1815 Governor Macquarie founds the Native Institution as a school for Aboriginal children of both sexes
1816 Governor Macquarie institutes an annual meeting of tribes with feasting and the distribution of blankets
1824 First Legislative Council of New South Wales is constituted
1826 Missionary activity is subsidised. London Missionary Society and the Reverend L. E. Threlkeld at Lake Macquarie
1834 John Batman signs a treaty with the Aboriginal people of Port Phillip. The Government disallows the treaty on the grounds that the land belonged to the Crown
1838 Fiftieth Anniversary of the arrival of the First Fleet
Bill for the Protection of Aborigines is drafted
Port Phillip Aborigines Protectorate is instituted
Waterloo Creek Massacre
Myall Creek Massacre
1839 An Act to allow the Aboriginal Natives of New South Wales to be received as competent Witnesses in Criminal Cases (30¼ Vic. No. 16)
1840 An Act to prohibit the Aboriginal Natives of New South Wales from having Fire Arms or Ammunition in their possession without the permission of a Magistrate (4¼ Vic. No. 8)
1842 Native Police is formed
1843 The Legislative Council is reconstituted to include elected members
1849 Port Phillip Aborigines Protectorate is abolished
1856 Responsible Government is instituted in New South Wales with the establishment of the elected Legislative Assembly
1858 Secret ballot is introduced in New South Wales
1867 An Act to prohibit the supply of Intoxicating Liquors to the Aboriginal Natives of New South Wales (31¼ Vic. No. 16)
1880 Association for the Protection of Aborigines is formed
1881 State Children's Relief Board is established giving the Government specific powers over children of any race 
Government appoints a Protector of Aborigines (George Thornton MLC)
1883 Board for the Protection of Aborigines is created by the Government
1892 Aborigines Protection Association turns over the management of the Mission Stations to the Board (Cumeragunja, Warangesda, Maloga and Brewarrina)
1893 A Girls' Dormitory is set up at Warangesda Station
1901 Commonwealth of Australia is established
1902 Women in New South Wales are granted the right to vote (excluding Aboriginal women)
1909 Aborigines Protection Act 1909 (No. 25) reconstitutes the Aborigines Protection Board.The Inspector-General of Police is now the Chairman.
1911 Cootamundra Girls' Home opens
1914 Beginning of First World War. Approximately 400 to 500 Aboriginal people serve as enlisted soldiers. Aboriginal children continue to be removed from their families during the period 1914 to 1918, including children whose fathers are overseas at the War.
1915 Aborigines Protection Amending Act 1915 (No. 2) gives the Board the right to assume control of an Aboriginal child
1918 Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (No. 27) excludes Aboriginal people from being on the electoral roll or voting 
Aborigines Protection (Amendment) Act 1918 (No. 7)
1924 Kinchela Boys' Home at Kempsey opens
Australian Aboriginal Progressive Association (AAPA) is formed
1927 Australian Aboriginal Progressive Association (AAPA) delivers a petition on Aboriginal concerns to the Premier
1929 Compulsory voting is introduced in New South Wales. Aboriginal people are still excluded from voting under the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918 (No. 27).
1934 Australian Aboriginal League (AAL) is formed
1936 Aborigines Protection (Amendment) Act 1936 (No. 32) gives additional wide powers to the Board
Aborigines Progressive Association (APA) is formed
1937 The Legislative Assembly of the Parliament of New South Wales sets up a Select Committee on the Aborigines Protection Board
1938 Sesquicentenary of the arrival of the First Fleet
Day of Mourning and Protest
Committee for Aboriginal Citizens Rights is formed
Australian Abo Call: the voice of the Aborigine, the journal of the Aborigines Progressive
Association (APA), is published from April
Public Service Board begins an Inquiry into the Aborigines Protection Board
1939 Beginning of Second World War. An estimated 3000 Aboriginal people and Islanders serve as formally enlisted soldiers, sailors or airmen. Aboriginal children continue to be removed from their families during the period 1939 to 1945, including children whose fathers are overseas at the War.
Cumeragunga strike
1940 Aborigines Protection (Amendment) Act 1940 (No. 12) reconstitutes the Aborigines
Protection Board as the Aborigines Welfare Board. The Under Secretary of the Colonial Secretary's Department is now the Chairman.
1941 Commonwealth Government extends child endowment benefits to all Aboriginal people who are not nomadic or supported by the Commonwealth or a State
1943 Aborigines Protection (Amendment) Act 1943 (No. 13) provides for the appointment of two Aboriginal people to the Board
1948 Under the Commonwealth Nationality and Citizenship Act 1948 (No. 83) all Aborigines are now British subjects and Australian citizens
1951 Commonwealth Government calls a Native Welfare Conference with the States (Victoria and Tasmania do not attend). The Conference endorses the principle of assimilation.
1953 The Senate of the Commonwealth Parliament sets up a Select Committee on Aboriginal Voting Rights
1956 Aboriginal-Australian Fellowship (AAF) is formed
1957 Meeting organised by the Aboriginal Australian Fellowship at Sydney Town Hall launches campaign for a referendum to change the Australian constitution
1958 Victorian Aboriginal Advancement League (VAAL) is formed
Federal Council for Aboriginal Advancement (FCAA) is formed
1960 Aboriginal-Australian Fellowship (AAF) calls for full citizenship rights
1962 Commonwealth Electoral Act is amended so that all Aboriginal people may vote
1963 Aborigines Protection (Amendment) Act 1963 (No. 7)
1964 Federal Council for Aboriginal Advancement (FCAA) changes its name to the Federal Council for the Advancement of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders (FCAATSI)
1965 Commonwealth - State Conference of Aboriginal Affairs Ministers endorses Assimilation Policy as national policy
Freedom Rides throughout northern New South Wales
The Parliament of New South Wales sets up a Joint Select Committee on Aborigines Welfare
1967 Commonwealth Referendum (27 May 1967) passes to change the Australian Constitution to remove the impediment to the Commonwealth Government making special laws with respect to Aboriginal people and to remove the impediments to counting Aboriginal people in the Census.
1969 Aborigines Act 1969 (No. 7) abolishes the Aborigines Welfare Board. All Aboriginal children under the care of the Board now become Wards of the State.
Directorate of Aboriginal Welfare is set up in the Department of Child Welfare and Social Welfare
1971 Aboriginal Flag is designed by Luritja artist Harold Thomas and flown for the first time in Adelaide
Commonwealth Government sets up the Ministry for Environment, Aborigines, and the Arts
Neville Bonner becomes the first Aboriginal Member of the Commonwealth Parliament as a Senator from Queensland
1972 Aboriginal Tent Embassy is set up on the lawns in front of Parliament House in Canberra
New Labor Commonwealth Government sets up the first separate Ministry and Department of Aboriginal Affairs
1973 Aborigines (Amendment) Act 1973 (No. 35)
An Aboriginal-elected National Aboriginal Conference is established to advise the Commonwealth Government on Aboriginal affairs
Commonwealth Government announces the Self Determination Policy for Aboriginal affairs
1975 Commonwealth Government takes over the functions of the New South Wales State Directorate of Aboriginal Welfare
Aboriginal Services Branch is created in the Department of Youth and Community Services
Title to Missions and Reserves in New South Wales is handed over to the Aboriginal Lands Trust
1976 Aboriginal Health Unit of the Department of Health is set up
1978 The Legislative Assembly of the Parliament of New South Wales sets up a Select Committee on Aborigines
1980 Link-Up (NSW) - an Aboriginal organisation formed to reunite and support Aboriginal people removed from their families - is established
1981 Aboriginal Advisory Board to the Housing Commission is established
1982 Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs (New South Wales) is established
1983 Aboriginal Land Rights Act 1983 (No. 42) revokes any dedication or reservation under the Crown Lands Consolidation Act 1913 or the Western Lands Act 1901 pursuant to transfers of land to an Aboriginal Land Council
1987 Commonwealth Government sets up the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody
1988 Bicentenary of the arrival of the First Fleet
Office of Aboriginal Affairs established in the Premier's Department
1990 Aboriginal Land Rights (Revival of Financial Provision) Act 1990 (No. 32)
1991 Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody reports
1992 'Mabo' decision of the High Court recognises the concept of native title and overturns the doctrine of terra nullius (the notion that Australia was empty and owned by nobody until British settlement)
1993 Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs is re-established. It oversees the Office of Aboriginal Affairs and the NSW Aboriginal Land Council.
Commonwealth Native Title Act 1993 (No. 110)
1994 Native Title (New South Wales) Act 1994 (No. 45)
1995 Office of Aboriginal Affairs is abolished and the Department of Aboriginal Affairs is established  Aboriginal Land Rights Amendment Act 1995 (No. 39)
National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from Their Families commences
1996 'Wik' decision of the High Court - leases granted by the Crown do not extinguish Aboriginal land rights
1997 Bringing Them Home: Report of the National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from Their Families
National Parks and Wildlife Amendment (Aboriginal Ownership) Act 1996 (No. 142) comes into effect, amending the Aboriginal Land Rights Act 1983. It establishes a Register of Aboriginal Owners by the Registrar, Aboriginal Land Rights Act.

Appendix 3 - Bibliography

There are a number of guides relating to Aboriginal people which may be useful for research. This bibliography is not meant to be exhaustive and should be regarded as a guide only. Many of these publications have a section on other sources which may be useful to the researcher. A useful book which will give the reader some background and a context is Heather Goodall, Invasion to Embassy: Land in Aboriginal Politics in New South Wales, 1770-1972, Allen & Unwin/Black Books, Sydney, 1996. This publication won the NSW Premier's Australian History Prize, 1997.

Australia

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People in Commonwealth Records: A Guide to Records in the Australian Archives ACT Regional Office, compiled by Ros Fraser, Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra, 1993.

Aboriginal deaths in custody: the Royal Commission and its records, 1987-91, compiled by Peter Nagle and Richard Summerrell, Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra, 1996.

ANSELL, Leo J. (ed.), Register of Church archives: a select guide to resource material in Australia. 2nd ed. Church Archivists' Society, Toowoomba, Qld., 1985.

Relations in records: a guide to family history sources in the Australian Archives. Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra, 1988.

SMITH, Diane & HALSTEAD, Boronia, Lookin for your Mob: a guide to tracing Aboriginal family trees. Aboriginal Studies Press, Canberra, 1990.

New South Wales

Aboriginal Reserves in N.S.W., A Land Rights Research Aid: A Listing from Archival Material of Former Aboriginal Reserves together with Information required to access them. Prepared by A. McGuiggan. (New South Wales Ministry for Aboriginal Affairs: Occasional paper; No. 4), The Ministry, Sydney, circa 1983.

BRINDLE, Ken, An Index to the Aboriginal Welfare Board Correspondence Files, 1945-1969, unpublished manuscript held by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, Canberra, compiled 1987. Also held by the New South Wales Department of Aboriginal Affairs.

BROOK, J. and KOHEN, J.L., The Parramatta Native Institution and the Black Town: A History. New South Wales University Press, Kensington, NSW, 1991.

Concise Guide to State Archives from the Riverina and Murray Regions, CSU Regional Archives, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW, 1997.

The Concise Guide to the State Archives of New South Wales. 2nd ed. Archives Authority of New South Wales, Sydney, 1992 (Guide to the State Archives of New South Wales; No. 13) [published on microfiche].

ELPHICK, Beverley and Don, Kinchela Aboriginal Home and School, Alphabetical Index of Students. The authors, Canberra, ACT, 1997.

Government Schools of New South Wales 1848 to 1993. 4th ed. Department of School Education Library, [Parramatta, NSW], 1993.

Information Leaflet No. 23. Auditor General Reports of Inspectors of Public Accounts 1907-1930. Archives Authority of New South Wales, Sydney, 1980.

Pathfinder no. 6: Black routes through the library, a guide to Aboriginal family and local history resources relating to NSW. Compiled by Ron Briggs and Melissa Jackson. State Library of New South Wales, Sydney, 1996.

Votes and Proceedings of the Legislative Council [of New South Wales], 1856-1905. Government Printer, Sydney, 1857 - 1906. Joint Volumes of the Parliamentary Papers of the Legislative Assembly and the Legislative Council [of New South Wales], 1906-. Government Printer, Sydney, 1906-.

A report by the Protector of Aborigines respecting the number and condition of Aboriginal people first appears in the Votes and Proceedings in 1883. It comprises a table divided into district and sub-divided by Police stations and shows the numbers and ages of Aborigines and half castes, details of employment, government assistance in particular fishing boats or blankets, what form of education children receive; alcohol use; medical arrangements problems; and any other information (editorial note: this is the language as it is used in the record). A census of Aboriginal people commenced in 1885 and is reproduced in the Votes and Proceedings as an appendix to the annual report of the Aboriginal Protection Board most years until 1915.

Northern Territory

The Northern Territory Archives Service has an unpublished preliminary guide to its records relating to Aboriginal people. Further information may be obtained by contacting the Archivist - Information Services, Northern Territory Archives Service. Telephone: (08) 8924 7677.

Queensland

Records Guide Volume 1: a guide to Queensland Government records relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Queensland State Archives and Department of Family Services and Aboriginal and Islander Affairs, Brisbane, 1994.

South Australia

Guide to Records relating to Aboriginal People, Volumes 1-5, South Australia State Records, Adelaide, 1988-91.

Victoria

'My Heart is Breaking': A Resource Guide to Archival Records about Aboriginal People in the Australian Archives, Victorian Regional Office and the Public Record Office of Victoria, compiled by Myrna Deverall and Ian MacFarlane. Australian Archives and Public Record Office of Victoria, Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra, 1993.

Victorian Aborigines 1835-1901, compiled by Ian McFarlane, Public Record Office of Victoria and Government Information Centre, Melbourne, 1984.

Appendix 4 - Some useful addresses

The following list of agencies and organisations may be of assistance. This list is not exhaustive.

For more information on State Records relating to Aboriginal people please contact the Manager, Public Access on (02) 9673 1788 or email accman@records.nsw.gov.au.

Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS)
Acton House, Marcus Clarke Street CANBERRA ACT 2600
Postal Address
GPO Box 553, CANBERRA ACT 2601
Telephone: (02) 6246 1111    Fax: (02) 6249 7310
AIATSIS has an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Biographical Index (ABI) available to search online. The ABI is a personal name index to published material held in the AIATSIS Library.

 

Crown Solicitor's Office
Level 15, Goodsell Building
8-12 Chifley Square SYDNEY NSW 2000
Postal Address
GPO Box 25, SYDNEY NSW 2001
Telephone: (02) 9228 7437    Fax: (02) 9233 1760

Aboriginal Affairs NSW
Level 13, Tower B, Centennial Plaza 
280 Elizabeth Street Surry Hills NSW 2010
Telephone (toll free): 1800 019 998 Fax: (02) 9262 2690
Telephone: (02) 9219 0700

Family History Unit
Aboriginal Affairs NSW
Level 13, Tower B, Centennial Plaza
280 Elizabeth Street Surry Hills NSW 2010
Telephone (toll free): 1800 019 998 Fax: (02) 9219 0790
Telephone: (02) 9219 0700

Department of Education and Training
Historical Collections Officer
Level 8, Signature Tower
2-10 Wentworth Street PARRAMATTA NSW 2150
Postal Address
PO Box 6000, PARRAMATTA NSW 2124
Telephone: (02) 9561 1820    Fax: (02) 9561 1248

NSW Ministry of Health
Records Management Unit
73 Miller Street, NORTH SYDNEY NSW 2060
Postal Address
Locked Bag 961, NORTH SYDNEY NSW 2059
Telephone: (02) 9391 9076    Fax: (02) 9391 9101

Department of Housing
Records Management Unit
23-31 Moore Street LIVERPOOL NSW 2170
Postal Address
PO Box 466, LIVERPOOL NSW 2170
Telephone: (02) 9821 6111    Fax: (02) 9821 6900

Department of Land and Water Conservation
23-33 Bridge Street SYDNEY NSW 2000
Postal Address
PO Box 39, SYDNEY NSW 2001
Telephone: (02) 9228 6359    Fax: (02) 9228 6455

Link-Up NSW Aboriginal Corporation
PO Box 93, Lawson NSW 2783
Telephone: 1800 624 332 or (02) 4758 1011
Fax: (02) 4759 2607
Email: linkup@nsw.link-up.org.au
Website: www.linkupnsw.org.au
Link-Up (NSW) Aboriginal Corporation was founded around 1980 to assist all Aboriginal people who have been fostered, adopted or raised in institutions to reconnect with their family.

Local Courts Director's Office
Level 1, Downing Centre
143-147 Liverpool Street SYDNEY NSW 2000
Telephone: (02) 9287 7420    Fax: (02) 9287 7900

Parliament House
Macquarie Street Sydney NSW 2000
Telephone: (02) 9230 2615    Fax: (02) 9230 3015

Department of Premier and Cabinet
Level 39, Governor Macquarie Tower
1 Farrer Place, Sydney NSW 2000
Postal Address
GPO Box 5341, SYDNEY NSW 2001
Telephone: (02) 9228 5555    Fax: (02) 9231 1110

Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages
Level 1, 191-199 Thomas Street
Haymarket, SYDNEY NSW 2000
Postal Address
GPO Box 30, SYDNEY NSW 2001
Telephone: (02) 9243 8521    Fax: (02) 9243 8640
Adoptions Enquiries: (02) 9243 8688

Society of Australian Genealogists
Richmond Villa
120 Kent Street SYDNEY NSW 2000
Telephone: (02) 9247 3953    Fax: (02) 9241 4872

State Library of New South Wales
Macquarie Street SYDNEY NSW 2000
Telephone: (02) 9273 1414    Fax: (02) 9273 1255
The State Library of NSW has an index to material held at the State Library relating to Aboriginal people called InfoKoori.

Records relating to Aboriginal people held outside of NSW

Australian Capital Territory | Northern Territory | Queensland | South Australia | Tasmania | Victoria | Western Australia | State Records Office of Western Australia | Department of Indigenous Affairs

Australian Capital Territory

National Archives of Australia
Bringing Them Home Name Index enquiries
PO Box 7425, Canberra BC ACT 2610
Telephone: (02) 6212 3900
Freecall: 1300 886 881
Fax: 1300 886 882 or (02) 6212 3999
Email: ref@naa.gov.au
Website: www.naa.gov.au

Australian Institute of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS)
Family History Unit

GPO Box 553, Canberra ACT 2601
Freecall: 1800 730 129
Fax: (02) 6261 4287
Email: family@aiatsis.gov.au
Website: www.aiatsis.gov.au/library/family_history_tracing

Australian War Memorial
GPO Box 345, Canberra ACT 2601
Telephone: (02) 6243 4211
Fax: (02) 6243 4325
Website: www.awm.gov.au/

Noel Butlin Archives Centre
ANU Archives Program, Division of Information
Building 2, Menzies Library
Australian National University Canberra ACT 0200
Telephone: (02) 6125 2219
Fax: (02) 6125 0140
Email: butlin.archives@anu.edu.au
Website: www.archives.anu.edu.au/nbac/html/index.php

Northern Territory

Northern Territory Archives Service
PO Box 874, Darwin NT 0801
Telephone: (08) 8924 7677
Fax: (08) 8924 7660
Email: nt.archives@nt.gov.au
Website: www.nt.gov.au/nreta/ntas/collection/index.html

Queensland

Queensland State Archives
PO Box 1397, Sunnyhills QLD 4109
Telephone: (07) 3131 7777
Fax: (07) 3131 7764
Email: info@archives.qld.gov.au
Website: www.archives.qld.gov.au

Department of Communities and Personal Histories
PO Box 15397, Brisbane City East QLD 4001
Telephone: (07) 3404 3622
Freecall: 1800 650 230

South Australia

State Records of South Australia
Aboriginal Access Team

GPO Box 1072, Adelaide SA 5001
Telephone: (08) 8343 6820 or (08) 8204 8798
Fax: (08) 8204 8777
Email: srsaAboriginalSevices@saugov.sa.gov.au
Website: www.archives.sa.gov.au

Tasmania

Archives Office of Tasmania
77 Murray St, Hobart TAS 7000
Telephone: (03) 6233 7488
Fax: (03) 6233 7471
Email: archives.tasmania@education.ta.gov.au
Website: www.archives.tas.gov.au

Victoria

Public Records Office Victoria

Koori Records Unit
Victorian Archives Centre
PO Box 2100, North Melbourne VIC 3051
Telephone: (03) 9348 5600
Freecall: 1800 657 452
Fax: (03) 9348 5656
Email: ask.prov@prov.vic.gov.au
Website: www.prov.vic.gov.au

Western Australia

Family Information Records Bureau

Family and Children's Services
189 Royal St, East Perth WA 6004
Telephone: (08) 9222 2777
Freecall: 1800 000 277
Fax: (08) 9222 2767
Website: www.community.wa.gov.au/fcs/_content/aboriginal_family/index.htm

State Records Office of Western Australia

Aboriginal Family History
Alexander Library Building
James St West Entrance
Perth Cultural Centre, Perth WA 6000
Telephone: (08) 9427 3360
Fax: (08) 9427 3368
Email: sro@sro.wa.gov.au
Website: www.sro.wa.gov.au/community/aboriginalhistory.asp

Department of Indigenous Affairs

Aboriginal Family History Information Services
Level 1, 197 George's Tce, Perth WA 6000
Telephone: (08) 9235 8075
Fax: (08) 9235 8022
Website: www.dia.wa.gov.au

May 1998
The State Records Authority of New South Wales
Sydney NSW, Australia.
© Copyright reserved by the Government of New South Wales, 1998. All rights reserved.
No part of this publication may be reproduced by any method without the prior written consent of the State Records Authority of New South Wales.
ISBN 0 7310 1737 4    First published 1998.